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Uptake of COVID-19 vaccinations amongst 3,433,483 children and young people: meta-analysis of UK prospective cohorts

Sarah Aldridge, Utkarsh Agrawal, Siobhán Murphy, Tristan Millington, Ashley Akbari Orcid Logo, Fatima Almaghrabi, Sneha N. Anand, Stuart Bedston, Rosalind Goudie, Rowena Griffiths, Mark Joy, Emily Lowthian, Simon de Lusignan Orcid Logo, Lynsey Patterson, Chris Robertson Orcid Logo, Igor Rudan, Declan T. Bradley Orcid Logo, Ronan Lyons Orcid Logo, Aziz Sheikh, Rhiannon Owen Orcid Logo

Nature Communications, Volume: 15, Issue: 1

Swansea University Authors: Sarah Aldridge, Ashley Akbari Orcid Logo, Ronan Lyons Orcid Logo, Rhiannon Owen Orcid Logo

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Abstract

SARS-CoV-2 infection in children and young people (CYP) can lead to life-threatening COVID-19, transmission within households and schools, and the development of long COVID. Using linked health and administrative data, we investigated vaccine uptake among 3,433,483 CYP aged 5–17 years across all UK...

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Published in: Nature Communications
ISSN: 2041-1723
Published: Springer Science and Business Media LLC 2024
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa65851
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Abstract: SARS-CoV-2 infection in children and young people (CYP) can lead to life-threatening COVID-19, transmission within households and schools, and the development of long COVID. Using linked health and administrative data, we investigated vaccine uptake among 3,433,483 CYP aged 5–17 years across all UK nations between 4th August 2021 and 31st May 2022. We constructed national cohorts and undertook multi-state modelling and meta-analysis to identify associations between demographic variables and vaccine uptake. We found that uptake of the first COVID-19 vaccine among CYP was low across all four nations compared to other age groups and diminished with subsequent doses. Age and vaccination status of adults living in the same household were identified as important risk factors associated with vaccine uptake in CYP. For example, 5–11 year-olds were less likely to receive their first vaccine compared to 16–17 year-olds (adjusted Hazard Ratio [aHR]: 0.10 (95%CI: 0.06–0.19)), and CYP in unvaccinated households were less likely to receive their first vaccine compared to CYP in partially vaccinated households (aHR: 0.19, 95%CI 0.13–0.29).
Keywords: Epidemiology, Health policy, preventative medicine, SARS-Cov-2
College: Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
Funders: This research is part of the Data and Connectivity National Core Study, led by Health Data Research (HDR) UK in partnership with the Office for National Statistics and funded by UK Research and Innovation (grant ref MC_PC_20058) [UA, SM, AA, SB, MJ, EL, SL, CR, DB, RAL, AS]. Data‌ ‌and‌ ‌Connectivity:‌ ‌COVID-19‌ Vaccines‌ ‌Pharmacovigilance‌ National Core Study - Uptake, safety and effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines in: pregnancy; children and young people; those receiving booster doses; and disease caused by different variants (2021.0158) [UA, SM, AA, SB, MJ, SL, LP, CR, DB, RAL, AS, RKO] is a partnership between University of Edinburgh, University of Oxford, University of Strathclyde, Queen’s University Belfast, Swansea University, Imperial College London and the Office for National Statistics. This partnership was funded by HDR UK and The Alan Turing Institute. RKO is supported by the Academy of Medical Sciences/the Wellcome Trust/ the Government Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy/the British Heart Foundation/Diabetes UK Springboard Award (SBF006\1122). This work was supported by HDR UK, which receives its funding from HDR UK Ltd (HDR-9006) [SA, AA, SB, RGr, EL, RAL, RKO], funded by the UK Medical Research Council, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, Economic and Social Research Council, Department of Health and Social Care (England), Chief Scientist Office of the Scottish Government Health and Social Care Directorates, Health and Social Care Research and Development Division (Welsh Government), Public Health Agency (Northern Ireland), British Heart Foundation (BHF) and the Wellcome Trust. This work was supported by the Administrative Data Research (ADR) Wales programme of work. ADR Wales, part of the ADR UK investment, unites research expertise from Swansea University Medical School and WISERD (Wales Institute of Social and Economic Research and Data) at Cardiff University with analysts from Welsh Government. ADR UK is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), part of UK Research and Innovation. This research was supported by ESRC funding, including Administrative Data Research Wales (ES/W012227/1) [AA, SB, RAL]. Additionally the authors acknowledge the support of BREATHE—The Health Data Research Hub for Respiratory Health (MC_PC_19004) [AS], which is funded through the UK Research and Innovation Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund and delivered through Health Data Research UK. This work was also supported by the Con-COV team funded by the Medical Research Council (grant number: MR/V028367/1) [AA, RAL].
Issue: 1