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'Pandemia': A reckoning of UK universities' corporate response to COVID-19 and its academic fallout / Richard Watermeyer, Kalpana Shankar, Tom Crick, Cathryn Knight, Fiona McGaughey, Joanne Hardman, Venkata Ratnadeep Suri, Roger Chung, Dean Phelan

British Journal of Sociology of Education

Swansea University Authors: Tom Crick, Cathryn Knight

  • Accepted Manuscript under embargo until: 5th January 2023

Abstract

Universities in the UK, and in other countries like Australia and the USA, have responded to the operational and financial challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic by prioritising institutional solvency and enforcing changes to the work-practices and profiles of their staff. For academics, an a...

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Published in: British Journal of Sociology of Education
ISSN: 0142-5692 1465-3346
Published: Taylor & Francis 2021
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa56985
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first_indexed 2021-05-29T08:43:40Z
last_indexed 2021-08-14T03:21:22Z
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spelling 2021-08-13T15:45:23.8318506 v2 56985 2021-05-29 'Pandemia': A reckoning of UK universities' corporate response to COVID-19 and its academic fallout 200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99 0000-0001-5196-9389 Tom Crick Tom Crick true false e43d033fc7f2ccc9317c49df10b9b7bb 0000-0002-7574-3090 Cathryn Knight Cathryn Knight true false 2021-05-29 EDUC Universities in the UK, and in other countries like Australia and the USA, have responded to the operational and financial challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic by prioritising institutional solvency and enforcing changes to the work-practices and profiles of their staff. For academics, an adjustment to institutional life under COVID-19 has been dramatic and resulted in the overwhelming majority making a transition to prolonged remote-working. Many have endured significant work intensification; others have lost — or may soon lose — their jobs. The impact of the pandemic appears transformational and for the most part negative. This article reports the experiences of n=1,099 UK academics specific to the corporate response of institutional leadership to the COVID-19 crisis. We find articulated a story of universities in the grip of 'pandemia' and COVID-19 emboldening processes and protagonists of neoliberal governmentality and market-reform that pay little heed to considerations of human health and wellbeing. Journal Article British Journal of Sociology of Education 0 Taylor & Francis 0142-5692 1465-3346 5 7 2021 2021-07-05 10.1080/01425692.2021.1937058 COLLEGE NANME Education COLLEGE CODE EDUC Swansea University Not Required 2021-08-13T15:45:23.8318506 2021-05-29T09:37:34.2713851 College of Arts and Humanities School of Education Richard Watermeyer 1 Kalpana Shankar 2 Tom Crick 0000-0001-5196-9389 3 Cathryn Knight 0000-0002-7574-3090 4 Fiona McGaughey 5 Joanne Hardman 6 Venkata Ratnadeep Suri 7 Roger Chung 8 Dean Phelan 9 Under embargo Under embargo 2021-05-29T09:42:21.3115851 Output 278936 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2023-01-05T00:00:00.0000000 Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (CC-BY-NC). true eng
title 'Pandemia': A reckoning of UK universities' corporate response to COVID-19 and its academic fallout
spellingShingle 'Pandemia': A reckoning of UK universities' corporate response to COVID-19 and its academic fallout
Tom, Crick
Cathryn, Knight
title_short 'Pandemia': A reckoning of UK universities' corporate response to COVID-19 and its academic fallout
title_full 'Pandemia': A reckoning of UK universities' corporate response to COVID-19 and its academic fallout
title_fullStr 'Pandemia': A reckoning of UK universities' corporate response to COVID-19 and its academic fallout
title_full_unstemmed 'Pandemia': A reckoning of UK universities' corporate response to COVID-19 and its academic fallout
title_sort 'Pandemia': A reckoning of UK universities' corporate response to COVID-19 and its academic fallout
author_id_str_mv 200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99
e43d033fc7f2ccc9317c49df10b9b7bb
author_id_fullname_str_mv 200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99_***_Tom, Crick
e43d033fc7f2ccc9317c49df10b9b7bb_***_Cathryn, Knight
author Tom, Crick
Cathryn, Knight
author2 Richard Watermeyer
Kalpana Shankar
Tom Crick
Cathryn Knight
Fiona McGaughey
Joanne Hardman
Venkata Ratnadeep Suri
Roger Chung
Dean Phelan
format Journal article
container_title British Journal of Sociology of Education
container_volume 0
publishDate 2021
institution Swansea University
issn 0142-5692
1465-3346
doi_str_mv 10.1080/01425692.2021.1937058
publisher Taylor & Francis
college_str College of Arts and Humanities
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofartsandhumanities
hierarchy_top_title College of Arts and Humanities
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofartsandhumanities
hierarchy_parent_title College of Arts and Humanities
department_str School of Education{{{_:::_}}}College of Arts and Humanities{{{_:::_}}}School of Education
document_store_str 0
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description Universities in the UK, and in other countries like Australia and the USA, have responded to the operational and financial challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic by prioritising institutional solvency and enforcing changes to the work-practices and profiles of their staff. For academics, an adjustment to institutional life under COVID-19 has been dramatic and resulted in the overwhelming majority making a transition to prolonged remote-working. Many have endured significant work intensification; others have lost — or may soon lose — their jobs. The impact of the pandemic appears transformational and for the most part negative. This article reports the experiences of n=1,099 UK academics specific to the corporate response of institutional leadership to the COVID-19 crisis. We find articulated a story of universities in the grip of 'pandemia' and COVID-19 emboldening processes and protagonists of neoliberal governmentality and market-reform that pay little heed to considerations of human health and wellbeing.
published_date 2021-07-05T04:20:09Z
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score 10.81997