No Cover Image

Journal article 41 views 5 downloads

The ability of Phaeobacter inhibens to produce tropodithietic acid influences the community dynamics of a microalgal microbiome

Nathalie Nina Suhr Eiris Henriksen Orcid Logo, Morten Dencker Schostag Orcid Logo, Simone Rosen Balder Orcid Logo, Pernille Kjersgaard Bech Orcid Logo, Mikael Lenz Strube Orcid Logo, Eva C. Sonnenschein Orcid Logo, Lone Gram Orcid Logo

ISME Communications, Volume: 2, Issue: 1

Swansea University Author: Eva C. Sonnenschein Orcid Logo

  • 61808.pdf

    PDF | Version of Record

    © The Author(s) 2022. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

    Download (2.38MB)

Abstract

Microbial secondary metabolites facilitate microbial interactions and are crucial for understanding the complexity of microbial community dynamics. The purpose of the present study was to determine how a secondary metabolite producing marine bacteria or its metabolite deficient mutant affected the m...

Full description

Published in: ISME Communications
ISSN: 2730-6151
Published: Springer Science and Business Media LLC 2022
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa61808
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
first_indexed 2022-11-17T12:27:51Z
last_indexed 2023-01-13T19:22:49Z
id cronfa61808
recordtype SURis
fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2022-11-17T12:35:15.0325082</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>61808</id><entry>2022-11-08</entry><title>The ability of Phaeobacter inhibens to produce tropodithietic acid influences the community dynamics of a microalgal microbiome</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>f6a4027578a15ea3e6453a54b849c686</sid><ORCID>0000-0001-6959-5100</ORCID><firstname>Eva C.</firstname><surname>Sonnenschein</surname><name>Eva C. Sonnenschein</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2022-11-08</date><deptcode>SBI</deptcode><abstract>Microbial secondary metabolites facilitate microbial interactions and are crucial for understanding the complexity of microbial community dynamics. The purpose of the present study was to determine how a secondary metabolite producing marine bacteria or its metabolite deficient mutant affected the microbiome of the marine microalgae Tetraselmis suecica during a 70 day long co-evolution experiment. Using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, we found that neither the tropodithietic acid (TDA)-producing Phaeobacter inhibens wildtype nor the TDA-deficient mutant had major impacts on the community composition. However, a subset of strains, displayed temporally different relative abundance trajectories depending on the presence of P. inhibens. In particular, a Winogradskyella strain displayed temporal higher relative abundance when the TDA-producing wildtype was present. Numbers of the TDA-producing wildtype were reduced significantly more than those of the mutant over time indicating that TDA production was not an advantage. In communities without the P. inhibens wildtype strain, an indigenous population of Phaeobacter increased over time, indicating that indigenous Phaeobacter populations cannot co-exist with the TDA-producing wildtype. Despite that TDA was not detected chemically, we detected transcripts of the tdaC gene indicating that TDA could be produced in the microbial community associated with the algae. Our work highlights the importance of deciphering longitudinal strain dynamics when addressing the ecological effect of secondary metabolites in a relevant natural community.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>ISME Communications</journal><volume>2</volume><journalNumber>1</journalNumber><paginationStart/><paginationEnd/><publisher>Springer Science and Business Media LLC</publisher><placeOfPublication/><isbnPrint/><isbnElectronic/><issnPrint/><issnElectronic>2730-6151</issnElectronic><keywords/><publishedDay>3</publishedDay><publishedMonth>11</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2022</publishedYear><publishedDate>2022-11-03</publishedDate><doi>10.1038/s43705-022-00193-6</doi><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Biosciences</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>SBI</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><funders>The study was supported by the Danish National Research Foundation (DNRF137) for the Center for Microbial Secondary Metabolites.</funders><projectreference/><lastEdited>2022-11-17T12:35:15.0325082</lastEdited><Created>2022-11-08T10:16:28.2890393</Created><path><level id="1">Faculty of Science and Engineering</level><level id="2">School of Biosciences, Geography and Physics - Biosciences</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Nathalie Nina Suhr Eiris</firstname><surname>Henriksen</surname><orcid>0000-0002-6588-6346</orcid><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Morten Dencker</firstname><surname>Schostag</surname><orcid>0000-0001-9221-1398</orcid><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Simone Rosen</firstname><surname>Balder</surname><orcid>0000-0001-9002-3828</orcid><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Pernille Kjersgaard</firstname><surname>Bech</surname><orcid>0000-0002-6028-9382</orcid><order>4</order></author><author><firstname>Mikael Lenz</firstname><surname>Strube</surname><orcid>0000-0003-0905-5705</orcid><order>5</order></author><author><firstname>Eva C.</firstname><surname>Sonnenschein</surname><orcid>0000-0001-6959-5100</orcid><order>6</order></author><author><firstname>Lone</firstname><surname>Gram</surname><orcid>0000-0002-1076-5723</orcid><order>7</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>61808__25817__51b8496c1ae94b6798cba7ec90a6ab62.pdf</filename><originalFilename>61808.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2022-11-17T12:33:09.2604797</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>2492441</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Version of Record</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><documentNotes>&#xA9; The Author(s) 2022. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License</documentNotes><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect><language>eng</language><licence>http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/</licence></document></documents><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2022-11-17T12:35:15.0325082 v2 61808 2022-11-08 The ability of Phaeobacter inhibens to produce tropodithietic acid influences the community dynamics of a microalgal microbiome f6a4027578a15ea3e6453a54b849c686 0000-0001-6959-5100 Eva C. Sonnenschein Eva C. Sonnenschein true false 2022-11-08 SBI Microbial secondary metabolites facilitate microbial interactions and are crucial for understanding the complexity of microbial community dynamics. The purpose of the present study was to determine how a secondary metabolite producing marine bacteria or its metabolite deficient mutant affected the microbiome of the marine microalgae Tetraselmis suecica during a 70 day long co-evolution experiment. Using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, we found that neither the tropodithietic acid (TDA)-producing Phaeobacter inhibens wildtype nor the TDA-deficient mutant had major impacts on the community composition. However, a subset of strains, displayed temporally different relative abundance trajectories depending on the presence of P. inhibens. In particular, a Winogradskyella strain displayed temporal higher relative abundance when the TDA-producing wildtype was present. Numbers of the TDA-producing wildtype were reduced significantly more than those of the mutant over time indicating that TDA production was not an advantage. In communities without the P. inhibens wildtype strain, an indigenous population of Phaeobacter increased over time, indicating that indigenous Phaeobacter populations cannot co-exist with the TDA-producing wildtype. Despite that TDA was not detected chemically, we detected transcripts of the tdaC gene indicating that TDA could be produced in the microbial community associated with the algae. Our work highlights the importance of deciphering longitudinal strain dynamics when addressing the ecological effect of secondary metabolites in a relevant natural community. Journal Article ISME Communications 2 1 Springer Science and Business Media LLC 2730-6151 3 11 2022 2022-11-03 10.1038/s43705-022-00193-6 COLLEGE NANME Biosciences COLLEGE CODE SBI Swansea University The study was supported by the Danish National Research Foundation (DNRF137) for the Center for Microbial Secondary Metabolites. 2022-11-17T12:35:15.0325082 2022-11-08T10:16:28.2890393 Faculty of Science and Engineering School of Biosciences, Geography and Physics - Biosciences Nathalie Nina Suhr Eiris Henriksen 0000-0002-6588-6346 1 Morten Dencker Schostag 0000-0001-9221-1398 2 Simone Rosen Balder 0000-0001-9002-3828 3 Pernille Kjersgaard Bech 0000-0002-6028-9382 4 Mikael Lenz Strube 0000-0003-0905-5705 5 Eva C. Sonnenschein 0000-0001-6959-5100 6 Lone Gram 0000-0002-1076-5723 7 61808__25817__51b8496c1ae94b6798cba7ec90a6ab62.pdf 61808.pdf 2022-11-17T12:33:09.2604797 Output 2492441 application/pdf Version of Record true © The Author(s) 2022. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title The ability of Phaeobacter inhibens to produce tropodithietic acid influences the community dynamics of a microalgal microbiome
spellingShingle The ability of Phaeobacter inhibens to produce tropodithietic acid influences the community dynamics of a microalgal microbiome
Eva C. Sonnenschein
title_short The ability of Phaeobacter inhibens to produce tropodithietic acid influences the community dynamics of a microalgal microbiome
title_full The ability of Phaeobacter inhibens to produce tropodithietic acid influences the community dynamics of a microalgal microbiome
title_fullStr The ability of Phaeobacter inhibens to produce tropodithietic acid influences the community dynamics of a microalgal microbiome
title_full_unstemmed The ability of Phaeobacter inhibens to produce tropodithietic acid influences the community dynamics of a microalgal microbiome
title_sort The ability of Phaeobacter inhibens to produce tropodithietic acid influences the community dynamics of a microalgal microbiome
author_id_str_mv f6a4027578a15ea3e6453a54b849c686
author_id_fullname_str_mv f6a4027578a15ea3e6453a54b849c686_***_Eva C. Sonnenschein
author Eva C. Sonnenschein
author2 Nathalie Nina Suhr Eiris Henriksen
Morten Dencker Schostag
Simone Rosen Balder
Pernille Kjersgaard Bech
Mikael Lenz Strube
Eva C. Sonnenschein
Lone Gram
format Journal article
container_title ISME Communications
container_volume 2
container_issue 1
publishDate 2022
institution Swansea University
issn 2730-6151
doi_str_mv 10.1038/s43705-022-00193-6
publisher Springer Science and Business Media LLC
college_str Faculty of Science and Engineering
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id facultyofscienceandengineering
hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofscienceandengineering
hierarchy_parent_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
department_str School of Biosciences, Geography and Physics - Biosciences{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Science and Engineering{{{_:::_}}}School of Biosciences, Geography and Physics - Biosciences
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description Microbial secondary metabolites facilitate microbial interactions and are crucial for understanding the complexity of microbial community dynamics. The purpose of the present study was to determine how a secondary metabolite producing marine bacteria or its metabolite deficient mutant affected the microbiome of the marine microalgae Tetraselmis suecica during a 70 day long co-evolution experiment. Using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, we found that neither the tropodithietic acid (TDA)-producing Phaeobacter inhibens wildtype nor the TDA-deficient mutant had major impacts on the community composition. However, a subset of strains, displayed temporally different relative abundance trajectories depending on the presence of P. inhibens. In particular, a Winogradskyella strain displayed temporal higher relative abundance when the TDA-producing wildtype was present. Numbers of the TDA-producing wildtype were reduced significantly more than those of the mutant over time indicating that TDA production was not an advantage. In communities without the P. inhibens wildtype strain, an indigenous population of Phaeobacter increased over time, indicating that indigenous Phaeobacter populations cannot co-exist with the TDA-producing wildtype. Despite that TDA was not detected chemically, we detected transcripts of the tdaC gene indicating that TDA could be produced in the microbial community associated with the algae. Our work highlights the importance of deciphering longitudinal strain dynamics when addressing the ecological effect of secondary metabolites in a relevant natural community.
published_date 2022-11-03T04:15:50Z
_version_ 1756419483576041472
score 10.926618