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Community established best practice recommendations for tephra studies—from collection through analysis

Kristi L. Wallace Orcid Logo, Marcus I. Bursik Orcid Logo, Stephen Kuehn Orcid Logo, Andrei V. Kurbatov Orcid Logo, Peter Abbott Orcid Logo, Costanza Bonadonna Orcid Logo, Katharine Cashman Orcid Logo, Siwan Davies Orcid Logo, Britta Jensen Orcid Logo, Christine Lane Orcid Logo, Gill Plunkett Orcid Logo, Victoria C. Smith Orcid Logo, Emma Tomlinson Orcid Logo, Thor Thordarsson, J. Douglas Walker Orcid Logo

Scientific Data, Volume: 9, Issue: 1

Swansea University Authors: Peter Abbott Orcid Logo, Siwan Davies Orcid Logo

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Abstract

Tephra is a unique volcanic product with an unparalleled role in understanding past eruptions, long-term behavior of volcanoes, and the effects of volcanism on climate and the environment. Tephra deposits also provide spatially widespread, high-resolution time-stratigraphic markers across a range of...

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Published in: Scientific Data
ISSN: 2052-4463
Published: Springer Science and Business Media LLC 2022
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa60656
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Abstract: Tephra is a unique volcanic product with an unparalleled role in understanding past eruptions, long-term behavior of volcanoes, and the effects of volcanism on climate and the environment. Tephra deposits also provide spatially widespread, high-resolution time-stratigraphic markers across a range of sedimentary settings and thus are used in numerous disciplines (e.g., volcanology, climate science, archaeology). Nonetheless, the study of tephra deposits is challenged by a lack of standardization that inhibits data integration across geographic regions and disciplines. We present comprehensive recommendations for tephra data gathering and reporting that were developed by the tephra science community to guide future investigators and to ensure that sufficient data are gathered for interoperability. Recommendations include standardized field and laboratory data collection, reporting and correlation guidance. These are organized as tabulated lists of key metadata with their definition and purpose. They are system independent and usable for template, tool, and database development. This standardized framework promotes consistent documentation and archiving, fosters interdisciplinary communication, and improves effectiveness of data sharing among diverse communities of researchers.
Item Description: Data availability:Te best practice recommendation workbooks64 are hosted on the Zenodo platform, an open data server for public comment to ensure dynamic and timely updates and include a DOI for referencing. Tese workbooks are MS Excel.xlsx fles that can be converted to.csv format and opened by other sofware. Te workbooks are considered living documents as we encourage active participation in updating these best practice protocols by the tephra community at large and ask that feedback and comments be emailed directly to the lead author following which they will be vetted by the community. The spreadsheets will be versioned periodically with updated recommendations from the community. We encourage the use of the current version of the recommendations in developing feld and analytical templates, data supplements for publications, databases, training guides, etc.Tephra data templates developed from the tephra best practice recommendations and intended for sample registration and data upload to SESAR and EarthChem can be downloaded from the EarthChem tephra portal (https://www.earthchem.org/communities/tephra/) and submitted for upload or used independently as data entry templates for personal use
College: College of Science
Funders: Te 2014–2019 workshops and document preparation were supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation (ICER 1740669, ICER 1928341 EAR 1443393 and ICER 1846400); the International Union for Quaternary Research; the Center for Geohazards Studies, University at Bufalo; and the U.S. Geological Survey Volcano Hazards Program. Additional supporting and collaborating organizations included Portland State University; Trinity College, Dublin; Concord University; INTAV; CANQUA; AMQUA; VHub; IAVCEI; and the Cities on Volcanoes initiative.
Issue: 1