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Sensory Processing Sensitivity: Associations with the detection of real degraded stimuli, and reporting of illusory stimuli and paranormal experiences / Jess M. Williams, Michelle Carr, Mark Blagrove

Personality and Individual Differences, Volume: 177, Start page: 110807

Swansea University Authors: Michelle Carr, Mark Blagrove

  • Accepted Manuscript under embargo until: 20th March 2023

Abstract

There are differences in Sensory Processing Sensitivity (SPS) within many species. In humans high SPS refers to greater responsivity to stimuli, slower, deeper processing, aesthetic sensitivity, and low threshold for sensory discomfort. This study tested whether SPS is associated with the accurate r...

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Published in: Personality and Individual Differences
ISSN: 0191-8869
Published: Elsevier BV 2021
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa56639
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Abstract: There are differences in Sensory Processing Sensitivity (SPS) within many species. In humans high SPS refers to greater responsivity to stimuli, slower, deeper processing, aesthetic sensitivity, and low threshold for sensory discomfort. This study tested whether SPS is associated with the accurate recognition of degraded auditory stimuli and susceptibility to auditory pareidolia (hearing illusory words when presented with ambiguous, degraded words). Fifty participants (mean age = 33.02; females n = 32, males n = 18) responded to degraded words presented in Deutsch’s phantom word illusion task. They then completed the Highly Sensitive Person Scale, which assesses SPS, and the Survey of Anomalous Experiences. SPS was significantly associated with the recognition of degraded stimuli, but not with pareidolia. Number of anomalous experiences reported by participants was significantly associated with SPS and pareidolia. This study shows objective validation of the Highly Sensitive Person Scale regarding detection of subtle external stimuli.
Keywords: Sensory Processing Sensitivity; Highly Sensitive Person Scale; Highly Sensitive Person; Auditory stimuli recognition; Pareidolia; Anomalous experience; Paranormal experience
College: College of Human and Health Sciences
Start Page: 110807