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Morgan’s Conventionalism versus WADA’s Use of the Prohibited List: The Case of Thyroxine / Andrew Bloodworth, Michael McNamee, R. Jaques

Sport, Ethics and Philosophy, Volume: 12, Issue: 4, Pages: 401 - 415

Swansea University Authors: Andrew Bloodworth, Michael McNamee

Abstract

Morgan has argued that attitudes to the medicalisation of sports are historically conditioned.While the history of doping offers contested versions of when the sports world turned againstconservative forces, Morgan has argued that these attitudes are out of step with prevailingnorms and that the Wor...

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Published in: Sport, Ethics and Philosophy
ISSN: 1751-1321 1751-133X
Published: 2018
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa43264
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spelling 2021-01-14T13:52:09.0285084 v2 43264 2018-08-13 Morgan’s Conventionalism versus WADA’s Use of the Prohibited List: The Case of Thyroxine 3d3183652dd8a45724e24c671b295889 0000-0002-4601-442X Andrew Bloodworth Andrew Bloodworth true false 85b0b1623e55d977378622a6aab7ee6e 0000-0002-5857-909X Michael McNamee Michael McNamee true false 2018-08-13 STSC Morgan has argued that attitudes to the medicalisation of sports are historically conditioned.While the history of doping offers contested versions of when the sports world turned againstconservative forces, Morgan has argued that these attitudes are out of step with prevailingnorms and that the World Anti Doping Agency's policy needs to be modified to better reflectthis. As an advocate of critical democracies in sports, he argues that anti-doping policy mustacknowledge and reflect these shifts in order to secure their legitimacy. In response, wecritically present the World Anti-Doping Agency's policy that incorporates the Prohibited Listof Substances and Methods for athletes. We evaluate the validity of the therapy-enhancementdistinction in relation to its role in both justifying and sustaining the operation of theProhibited List. In particular, we focus on the case of thyroxine, which has been the subjectof controversy in athletic doping. While thyroxine is not currently banned, critics haveclaimed that its use in the absence of a relevant pathology is tantamount to doping. Wechallenge Morgan's claim that a conventionalist defence of the therapy-enhancementdistinction is the best available, and his conclusion that this properly supports a morepermissive stance towards performance-enhancing drug use. Furthermore, we reject hisconventionalist support for democratic line drawing in relation to doping and in particular thestatus of thyroxine with regard to the prohibited list. We offer a modified defence of the statusquo, a qualified, naturalist account of health and disease, where athletes may be prescribeddrugs that are genuine responses to medical necessity that do not, or do not typically, threatenthe goods of athletic excellence. Journal Article Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 4 401 415 1751-1321 1751-133X Thyroxine, therapy, doping, enhancement, conventionalism 2 10 2018 2018-10-02 10.1080/17511321.2018.1509116 COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2021-01-14T13:52:09.0285084 2018-08-13T10:44:41.1293142 College of Engineering Sports Science Andrew Bloodworth 0000-0002-4601-442X 1 Michael McNamee 0000-0002-5857-909X 2 R. Jaques 3 0043264-03092018095838.pdf bloodworth2018(2).pdf 2018-09-03T09:58:38.0830000 Output 676658 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2020-02-29T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title Morgan’s Conventionalism versus WADA’s Use of the Prohibited List: The Case of Thyroxine
spellingShingle Morgan’s Conventionalism versus WADA’s Use of the Prohibited List: The Case of Thyroxine
Andrew, Bloodworth
Michael, McNamee
title_short Morgan’s Conventionalism versus WADA’s Use of the Prohibited List: The Case of Thyroxine
title_full Morgan’s Conventionalism versus WADA’s Use of the Prohibited List: The Case of Thyroxine
title_fullStr Morgan’s Conventionalism versus WADA’s Use of the Prohibited List: The Case of Thyroxine
title_full_unstemmed Morgan’s Conventionalism versus WADA’s Use of the Prohibited List: The Case of Thyroxine
title_sort Morgan’s Conventionalism versus WADA’s Use of the Prohibited List: The Case of Thyroxine
author_id_str_mv 3d3183652dd8a45724e24c671b295889
85b0b1623e55d977378622a6aab7ee6e
author_id_fullname_str_mv 3d3183652dd8a45724e24c671b295889_***_Andrew, Bloodworth
85b0b1623e55d977378622a6aab7ee6e_***_Michael, McNamee
author Andrew, Bloodworth
Michael, McNamee
author2 Andrew Bloodworth
Michael McNamee
R. Jaques
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container_title Sport, Ethics and Philosophy
container_volume 12
container_issue 4
container_start_page 401
publishDate 2018
institution Swansea University
issn 1751-1321
1751-133X
doi_str_mv 10.1080/17511321.2018.1509116
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
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description Morgan has argued that attitudes to the medicalisation of sports are historically conditioned.While the history of doping offers contested versions of when the sports world turned againstconservative forces, Morgan has argued that these attitudes are out of step with prevailingnorms and that the World Anti Doping Agency's policy needs to be modified to better reflectthis. As an advocate of critical democracies in sports, he argues that anti-doping policy mustacknowledge and reflect these shifts in order to secure their legitimacy. In response, wecritically present the World Anti-Doping Agency's policy that incorporates the Prohibited Listof Substances and Methods for athletes. We evaluate the validity of the therapy-enhancementdistinction in relation to its role in both justifying and sustaining the operation of theProhibited List. In particular, we focus on the case of thyroxine, which has been the subjectof controversy in athletic doping. While thyroxine is not currently banned, critics haveclaimed that its use in the absence of a relevant pathology is tantamount to doping. Wechallenge Morgan's claim that a conventionalist defence of the therapy-enhancementdistinction is the best available, and his conclusion that this properly supports a morepermissive stance towards performance-enhancing drug use. Furthermore, we reject hisconventionalist support for democratic line drawing in relation to doping and in particular thestatus of thyroxine with regard to the prohibited list. We offer a modified defence of the statusquo, a qualified, naturalist account of health and disease, where athletes may be prescribeddrugs that are genuine responses to medical necessity that do not, or do not typically, threatenthe goods of athletic excellence.
published_date 2018-10-02T04:00:14Z
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