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Strange Fruits: Grafting, Foreigners, and the Garden Imaginary in Northern France and Germany, 1250–1350

Patricia Skinner Orcid Logo, Theresa Tyers, Liz Herbert McAvoy

Speculum, Volume: 94, Issue: 2, Pages: 467 - 495

Swansea University Authors: Patricia Skinner Orcid Logo, Theresa Tyers, Liz Herbert McAvoy

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DOI (Published version): 10.1086/702738

Abstract

This article explores the medieval uses of the horticultural practice of grafting, inserting a shoot of one plant into the rootstock of another in order to benefit from the latter's established strength and growth. It provided a rich metaphor for use in religious sermons and didactic literature...

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Published in: Speculum
ISSN: 0038-7134 2040-8072
Published: Medieval Academy of America 2019
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa38103
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first_indexed 2018-01-15T19:25:49Z
last_indexed 2021-01-30T03:59:04Z
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spelling 2021-01-29T06:09:19.0957020 v2 38103 2018-01-15 Strange Fruits: Grafting, Foreigners, and the Garden Imaginary in Northern France and Germany, 1250–1350 b3dae60df8be2bd4b013434e12d991ea 0000-0002-7388-6645 Patricia Skinner Patricia Skinner true false e198cd40e0a93bc405c4d5d33e763532 Theresa Tyers Theresa Tyers true false ab33f307ffba5bb622f895b0c0e34b51 Liz Herbert McAvoy Liz Herbert McAvoy true false 2018-01-15 FGHSS This article explores the medieval uses of the horticultural practice of grafting, inserting a shoot of one plant into the rootstock of another in order to benefit from the latter's established strength and growth. It provided a rich metaphor for use in religious sermons and didactic literature from antiquity to the medieval period. Yet grafting was acknowledged to be 'contrary to nature', and a tension was thus set up between metaphor and practice that remained present and unresolved in medieval texts. This article explores one moment of that tension, reading the mystical works of Mechtild of Hackeborn (d.1298) and Gertrude of Helfta (d. 1302) in a northern European context where grafting was undergoing a transformation from a practice simply used for beneficial purposes - production of better fruit – to one that created pleasure and amusement for a growing aristocratic elite for whom controlling nature on their landed estates was simply another manifestation of their power, as exemplified by the pleasure park at Hesdin in Picardy. Journal Article Speculum 94 2 467 495 Medieval Academy of America 0038-7134 2040-8072 medieval; gardens; grafting; spiritual; metaphors 2 4 2019 2019-04-02 10.1086/702738 COLLEGE NANME Humanities and Social Sciences - Faculty COLLEGE CODE FGHSS Swansea University 2021-01-29T06:09:19.0957020 2018-01-15T11:14:31.7463314 Patricia Skinner 0000-0002-7388-6645 1 Theresa Tyers 2 Liz Herbert McAvoy 3 0038103-02042019164615.pdf 38103v2.pdf 2019-04-02T16:46:15.5030000 Output 318282 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2020-04-02T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title Strange Fruits: Grafting, Foreigners, and the Garden Imaginary in Northern France and Germany, 1250–1350
spellingShingle Strange Fruits: Grafting, Foreigners, and the Garden Imaginary in Northern France and Germany, 1250–1350
Patricia Skinner
Theresa Tyers
Liz Herbert McAvoy
title_short Strange Fruits: Grafting, Foreigners, and the Garden Imaginary in Northern France and Germany, 1250–1350
title_full Strange Fruits: Grafting, Foreigners, and the Garden Imaginary in Northern France and Germany, 1250–1350
title_fullStr Strange Fruits: Grafting, Foreigners, and the Garden Imaginary in Northern France and Germany, 1250–1350
title_full_unstemmed Strange Fruits: Grafting, Foreigners, and the Garden Imaginary in Northern France and Germany, 1250–1350
title_sort Strange Fruits: Grafting, Foreigners, and the Garden Imaginary in Northern France and Germany, 1250–1350
author_id_str_mv b3dae60df8be2bd4b013434e12d991ea
e198cd40e0a93bc405c4d5d33e763532
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author_id_fullname_str_mv b3dae60df8be2bd4b013434e12d991ea_***_Patricia Skinner
e198cd40e0a93bc405c4d5d33e763532_***_Theresa Tyers
ab33f307ffba5bb622f895b0c0e34b51_***_Liz Herbert McAvoy
author Patricia Skinner
Theresa Tyers
Liz Herbert McAvoy
author2 Patricia Skinner
Theresa Tyers
Liz Herbert McAvoy
format Journal article
container_title Speculum
container_volume 94
container_issue 2
container_start_page 467
publishDate 2019
institution Swansea University
issn 0038-7134
2040-8072
doi_str_mv 10.1086/702738
publisher Medieval Academy of America
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description This article explores the medieval uses of the horticultural practice of grafting, inserting a shoot of one plant into the rootstock of another in order to benefit from the latter's established strength and growth. It provided a rich metaphor for use in religious sermons and didactic literature from antiquity to the medieval period. Yet grafting was acknowledged to be 'contrary to nature', and a tension was thus set up between metaphor and practice that remained present and unresolved in medieval texts. This article explores one moment of that tension, reading the mystical works of Mechtild of Hackeborn (d.1298) and Gertrude of Helfta (d. 1302) in a northern European context where grafting was undergoing a transformation from a practice simply used for beneficial purposes - production of better fruit – to one that created pleasure and amusement for a growing aristocratic elite for whom controlling nature on their landed estates was simply another manifestation of their power, as exemplified by the pleasure park at Hesdin in Picardy.
published_date 2019-04-02T03:51:48Z
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