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Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract 778 views

Final year nursing students’ experiences of palliative care for people with dementia: a qualitative study / Tessa Watts

International Conference for Networking for Education in HealthCare

Swansea University Author: Tessa Watts

Abstract

Globally dementia prevalence is increasing. When set against ageing populations’ adult field nurses will inevitably encounter far more people affected by advanced dementia in the future. Caring for these people is skilled, knowledgeable work. However, international concern has been expressed about s...

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Published in: International Conference for Networking for Education in HealthCare
Published: Cambridge, UK 2013
Online Access: http://www.jillrogersassociates.co.uk/net2013abstractsandcorepapers.html
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa15757
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first_indexed 2013-09-07T01:58:36Z
last_indexed 2020-07-14T18:28:52Z
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spelling 2020-07-14T15:35:58.8704678 v2 15757 2013-09-06 Final year nursing students’ experiences of palliative care for people with dementia: a qualitative study 645eba17f8610ddff17b5022bc7f279c 0000-0002-1201-5192 Tessa Watts Tessa Watts true false 2013-09-06 HHC Globally dementia prevalence is increasing. When set against ageing populations’ adult field nurses will inevitably encounter far more people affected by advanced dementia in the future. Caring for these people is skilled, knowledgeable work. However, international concern has been expressed about suboptimal, inappropriate care standards and health professionals’ educational preparation. There is however a paucity of research exploring how adult field nursing students learn to care for those with advanced dementia. This study explored final year adult field nurses’ experiences of learning to care for people affected by advanced dementia. A qualitative design was adopted and the setting was a research-focused university in Wales, UK. Eleven adult field nursing undergraduates approaching programme completion participated. Data were collected using individual in-depth interviews in early 2013. Interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed and analysed using thematic interpretive analysis. Findings revealed that participants valued and aspired to patient-centred advanced dementia care. However, they felt insufficiently prepared and thus out of their depth for what they appreciated was skilled, knowledgeable work requiring interpersonal competence and confidence. Moreover, whilst evidence of a theory-practice gap emerged, participants appreciated that many practitioners were insufficiently prepared for advanced dementia care themselves. The study provided further evidence of the complexity of caring for those with advanced progressive illnesses, in this case advanced dementia and the associated knowledge and skills gap of students and practitioners. There are important implications for education in terms of curriculum development and learning from and in practice. Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract International Conference for Networking for Education in HealthCare Cambridge, UK Advanced Dementia, Palliative Care Nurse Education 5 9 2013 2013-09-05 http://www.jillrogersassociates.co.uk/net2013abstractsandcorepapers.html COLLEGE NANME Human and Health Sciences Central COLLEGE CODE HHC Swansea University 2020-07-14T15:35:58.8704678 2013-09-06T09:34:22.2895349 College of Human and Health Sciences Nursing Tessa Watts 0000-0002-1201-5192 1
title Final year nursing students’ experiences of palliative care for people with dementia: a qualitative study
spellingShingle Final year nursing students’ experiences of palliative care for people with dementia: a qualitative study
Tessa, Watts
title_short Final year nursing students’ experiences of palliative care for people with dementia: a qualitative study
title_full Final year nursing students’ experiences of palliative care for people with dementia: a qualitative study
title_fullStr Final year nursing students’ experiences of palliative care for people with dementia: a qualitative study
title_full_unstemmed Final year nursing students’ experiences of palliative care for people with dementia: a qualitative study
title_sort Final year nursing students’ experiences of palliative care for people with dementia: a qualitative study
author_id_str_mv 645eba17f8610ddff17b5022bc7f279c
author_id_fullname_str_mv 645eba17f8610ddff17b5022bc7f279c_***_Tessa, Watts
author Tessa, Watts
author2 Tessa Watts
format Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract
container_title International Conference for Networking for Education in HealthCare
publishDate 2013
institution Swansea University
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Nursing{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Nursing
url http://www.jillrogersassociates.co.uk/net2013abstractsandcorepapers.html
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description Globally dementia prevalence is increasing. When set against ageing populations’ adult field nurses will inevitably encounter far more people affected by advanced dementia in the future. Caring for these people is skilled, knowledgeable work. However, international concern has been expressed about suboptimal, inappropriate care standards and health professionals’ educational preparation. There is however a paucity of research exploring how adult field nursing students learn to care for those with advanced dementia. This study explored final year adult field nurses’ experiences of learning to care for people affected by advanced dementia. A qualitative design was adopted and the setting was a research-focused university in Wales, UK. Eleven adult field nursing undergraduates approaching programme completion participated. Data were collected using individual in-depth interviews in early 2013. Interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed and analysed using thematic interpretive analysis. Findings revealed that participants valued and aspired to patient-centred advanced dementia care. However, they felt insufficiently prepared and thus out of their depth for what they appreciated was skilled, knowledgeable work requiring interpersonal competence and confidence. Moreover, whilst evidence of a theory-practice gap emerged, participants appreciated that many practitioners were insufficiently prepared for advanced dementia care themselves. The study provided further evidence of the complexity of caring for those with advanced progressive illnesses, in this case advanced dementia and the associated knowledge and skills gap of students and practitioners. There are important implications for education in terms of curriculum development and learning from and in practice.
published_date 2013-09-05T03:27:16Z
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